Writing 100 Class Website

Class Resources Genres
WRIT 100 Alert!

All Writing 100 Students must register in WRIT 100 in both the Fall AND Spring terms. The Spring section must be the same as the Fall section you enrolled in.

That is a total of two (2) things to register for:
1. WRIT 100 Fall
2. WRIT 100 Spring (the SAME section as your fall section)

All lectures take place at the same time in both semesters.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

 
Technical Details:
I'm waitlisted. Now what?
I just want to write poetry. Why do I have to take the other four genres?
When can I talk to my instructor?
Can instructors comment on assignments before due dates?
What does the Coordinator do?
If I disagree with a mark on written work, what should I do?
How do I get my grades?
 
In the classroom:
Do I have to come to class?
I often miss my bus. Can I come late?
Why is being late such a big deal?
What if I have to miss a class (or more)?
Can I make special arrangements for taking exams and handing in assignments if I have a disability?
What about e-mail?
Can we submit assignments electronically?
Are laptops okay in class?
What's the work supposed to look like when we hand it in?
Why can't we spend more time in workshop mode?
How can I get an "A"?
Can I write science fiction and fantasy?

Moving on:
Do I need a certain grade to take workshops next year?
What happens if I score below a "B"?
I'm not a Writing student yet. How can I continue after WRIT 100?
If I get the grade of B (or above) in WRIT 100 can I take the workshops if there are spaces available after the Writing major students have registered?
Can I already be working on assignments to prepare for WRIT 100?
I have second-year standing from another institution. Why do I have to take WRIT 100?
I'm at Camosun. Can I take WRIT 100 before I transfer to UVic?


Technical Details


I'm waitlisted. Now what?
After the first class, should a space become available, waitlisted students will be contacted and invited to join the class.

If you do get into a class, check with the instructor for the outline and any missed handouts or assignments. If you decide to drop the course, please remove yourself from the waitlist to speed registration for others.
 

I just want to write poetry. Why do I have to take the other four genres?
It's never a bad thing for a writer to be versatile. Also, exposure to the workings of other genres can do strange and wonderful things (playwright Joan MacLeod began as a poet and novelist; nonfiction writer Lynne Van Luven's PhD was a study of English-Canadian drama; author Lorna Jackson's next book is creative nonfiction; author Bill Gaston's MFA thesis was a book of poems).
 
Also, potential traffic jams in the workshops—most often fiction—mean that keeping an open mind can expose you to the unexpected rewards of a new art form, and it might also speed your passage through the program.
 

When can I talk to my instructor?
The instructor has scheduled weekly Office Hours when students are encouraged to visit them on the second floor of the Fine Arts building. No need to book an appointment. If the scheduled hour conflicts with your timetable, arrange another time to meet.
 

Can the instructor comment on assignments before due dates?
The instructor can’t read all student work before it’s handed in. As well, no student should receive help that would unfairly improve their grade. But you’re encouraged to meet with your instructor for general comments and problem-solving. Bring specific examples to Office Hours; for example, “Is this metaphor clear?” or “Am I allowed to punctuate dialogue this way?”
 

What does the Coordinator do?
Maureen Bradley is the WRIT 100 Coordinator. She works with the Instructor and the Senior Marker to co-ordinate the Teaching Assistants so as to provide WRIT 100 students with consistent and fair policies to make the learning and teaching environments productive and efficient. She also meets with students when they have unresolved conflicts over grades.
 

If I disagree with a mark on written work, what should I do?
First, take a day away from it. Then, have another look and reflect on your instructor’s or the TA’s comments. If you’re still unclear as to how/why the mark was assigned, schedule a meeting to discuss things, either with the instructor or the TA marker. These meetings take place in person and are not conducted via email. Instructors may choose to let the mark stand, raise it, or lower it. If you’re still unsure, visit the Writing 100 Coordinator. He won’t change the grade but may help to show you where improvements can be made to the writing.
 

How do I get my grades?
The instructor will either post grades for sections once all work is marked, or return assignments noting the section grade. Given the volume of marking, this can take up to two weeks, so please be patient. Your final grade in W100 will be available online by the end of April.
 


In The Classroom


Do I have to come to class?
Students are expected to attend all classes. Your participation mark will suffer if you choose not to. As well, lecture material will appear on exams so attendance will ensure you know the material. Students who don’t attend regularly have trouble writing according to the instructor’s guidelines and standards; as well, exam marks are typically low.
 
You must be present at the first two classes to stay enrolled in the class. You’ll be dropped from the course if absent from the second class to make room for waitlisted students.
 

I often miss my bus. Can I come late?
You are expected to arrive on time. Chronic late arrivals will not only influence your participation grade, but will be considered disruption; the instructor may choose to deny these students entry. A late arrival may be treated as an absence if attendance has already been taken. If assignments are due and you arrive late, the instructor may not accept your assignment or may enforce late penalties. If you are late for a workshop class, you may be excluded from workshop and will not receive participation credit.
 

Why is being late such a big deal?
Writing classes require a professional environment, and punctual arrival shows respect for your classmates and instructor. The instructor has very few WRIT 100 classes in which to teach a lot of information. When students arrive late, the class focus shifts, concentration is lost, and the instructor has to contend with this distraction while trying to get the day’s work covered.
 

What if I have to miss a class (or more)?
Arrange with another student to take notes for you and to gather any handouts from that class. If the absence is for medical reasons, submit documentation promptly to your instructor in order to be excused from class. If the condition is ongoing, check in with your instructor, and also let other section instructors know of your condition when you begin their classes. It’s your responsibility to inform us of anything that might be hampering your success in the course.
Note: Students who are absent due to travel plans or employment are not excused from class; due dates and exams will not be rescheduled to accommodate them.
 

Can I make special arrangements for taking exams and handing in assignments if I have a disability?
Inform the instructor of any special needs that might have an influence on your learning in the classroom. If you are requesting academic concessions, we will need documentation from the Resource Centre for Students with a Disability (www.rcsd.uvic.ca) or from a medical doctor or counsellor. Possible concessions are made at the discretion of the instructor.
 

What about email?
Use email for information, clarification, or other brief messages. Do not use email for sensitive matters with the potential for conflict, such as extension requests, grade concerns, etc. These are best handled face to face–not at class time, but during Office Hours. That’s also the time to discuss philosophical concerns or to brainstorm assignment ideas or to talk about your writing. Email should not be used to explain your artistic intentions or writing ideas. Be courteous, brief, and professional.
 

Can we submit assignments electronically?
The instructor will specifically ask for exercises or assignments to be submitted using Moodle or other instructional platforms. Otherwise, all assignments are due in class, at the beginning of class, handed in by the writer. Read each course outline and assignment carefully; respect the instructor's instructions regarding submission.
 

Are laptops okay?
Laptops may be used for note-taking, but the classroom is a professional working environment. If you use your computer for anything other than class work, you are contravening classroom etiquette and causing disruption. If you’re downloading music or visiting via Facebook you’re not a functioning part of the class community. As well, instructors are distracted when students’ attention is not focused on class work. The instructor will conduct occasional checks; if you’re found to be misusing your computer privileges, expect to lose them.
 

What’s the work supposed to look like when we hand it in?
All writing to be workshopped or handed in must be professional and presentable: double-spaced and printed in 12-point font (no smaller); it must conform to the assigned length, and include a word count. The instructor may refuse to mark work that doesn’t meet these requirements, and you will not be allowed to resubmit that work. Correct spelling and attention to other technical matters indicate that you are serious about writing and that you understand the need to respect readers’ time by presenting a clean document. Credibility is lost when typos persist; your marks will reflect this inattention to detail.
 

Why can't we spend more time in workshop mode?
Each section of Writing 100 is brief and intense. It is primarily a lecture course. In order to prepare students for second-year workshops, the instructor must make sure that key concepts, terminology, and elements of craft and technique are introduced.
 

How can I get an "A"?
The instructor assesses written work according to demonstrated technique and creativity. You likely won’t shine in all four genres, but a high level of technical and artistic achievement in 3 or 4 of the 5 will be necessary for an A grade. Take a close look at the course’s Grading Grid, especially when assignments are returned to you. The Grid is a guide to standards in WRIT 100. A meeting with your instructor during Office Hours might help you to understand the specifics of your own work in relation to the Grid. Regular attendance, classroom engagement, keeping up with assigned readings to prepare for class, frequent drafting and re-drafting, and study groups to prepare for exams will all contribute to success in WRIT 100. Don’t underestimate the number of hours outside classroom time needed to perform at the highest level, typically thought to be 3 hours for every hour in the classroom. That’s about 8 hours a week for Writing 100. In some genres the instructor has posted examples of successful student writing so you can get a sense of A-level work in the Department.
 


Moving On


Do I need a certain grade to take workshops next year?
Students must attain an average grade of B+ (77%) in the combined 4 genres. Marks between 76.5 and 76.9 will be reviewed by the Coordinator, in consultation with Writing 100 instructors. If your scores on written assignments are low, and you achieve a B+ average because of high exam grades, a Writing major might not be the best choice for you. Workshops do not include exams; those grades are based almost entirely on written work.
 

What happens if I score below a B+?
Students who don’t achieve the necessary B+ and still wish to pursue a Writing major will need to take all five genres of WRIT 100 again and raise their grade. It is possible to take the Department’s lecture courses concurrently.
 

I’m not a Writing student yet. How can I continue after WRIT 100?
Students who want to continue in Writing must submit a re-registration form requesting a change of faculties to Fine Arts and their area of interest to Writing by March 31. The switch will depend on achieving a grade of B+ or better in WRIT 100. If students decide over the summer that they want to continue and take workshops, but they are not declared Writing majors, they won’t be able to register for September workshops, but may still register for our lecture courses. Workshops are few in number and typically only 15 students register in each one; they are only open to students doing a Writing major.
 

If I get the grade of B+ (or above) in WRIT 100 can I take the workshops if there are spaces available after the Writing major students have registered?
No. You must be registered as a Writing major to enroll in the workshops. There are, however a number of electives open to non-majors. They are listed at http://finearts.uvic.ca/elective/
 

Can I already be working on assignments to prepare for WRIT 100?
All writing for WRIT 100 is new work (not written in high school), unpublished, and work that hasn’t been workshopped or edited before. Instructors design exercises in order to help students achieve mastery of certain techniques and to support lecture topics. The course is not meant to test what you already know but how well you incorporate new knowledge creatively and expand your artistic vision. Students should read widely in all five WRIT 100 genres. When course packs and texts are available in the bookstore, do a preliminary scan and read what you can.
 

I have second-year standing from another institution. Why do I have to take WRIT 100?
Post-secondary institutions establish guidelines for transfer credits with other institutions. The courses or program you've taken don't supply the necessary pre-requisites that WRIT 100 does. WRIT 100 level transfer credit does not satisfy the WRIT 100 requirement or the grade requirement. Transfer credit will be used as electives in most cases. If you have questions about transfer credit contact the Fine Arts Advisor.
 

I’m at Camosun. Can I take WRIT 100 before I transfer to UVic?
The Department of Writing has an arrangement with Camosun College that allows students with a letter of permission to take WRIT 100. Once you have the letter (speak with your academic advisor at Camosun about how to arrange it), you will register through Admissions at UVic as a visiting student on a letter of permission and receive a UVic visiting student number.
Please note: You will have to apply to UVic through Admissions again by March 31 if/when you transfer to UVic. Only Writing majors are permitted to take workshops in second year.
 

WRIT 100 Index Page | Summary | Instructors | FAQ | Coordinator

 

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