Kim Adams wins Governor-General’s Award

Toronto-based sculptor and former Visual Arts student Kim Adams has been named one of the winners of the 2014 Governor-General’s Awards in Visual and Media Arts.

Kim Adams (photo: Henry Feather)

Kim Adams (photo: Henry Feather)

Recognized internationally for his large sculptures—often created from a mix of eclectic and everyday objects, including vehicles, dolls, toys and bicycles—Adams earns $25,000 for the Governor-General’s Award. This latest honour comes hot on the heels of two other significant awards for Adams: a 2013 Guggenheim Fellowship and the 2012 Gershon Iskowitz Prize from the Art Gallery of Ontario, which came with a $50,000 award.

Adams studied in the Visual Arts department from 1975 to 1980, when he also took courses in Theatre, Art in Education and History in Art. (Score one for interdisciplinarity!) In this video of his work, which features footage of various pieces and a glimpse inside his studio, Adams mentions the influence Visual Arts professor emeritus Mowry Baden had on the development of his work. “When we learned art history, it was through somebody who knew art today—and that was Mowry Baden. We started seeing things that were more real—the perception of the colours, the scale and the size, what happens between it and you and that space between. For me, it was the street level, I was trying to pull that into the art.”

One of eight veteran Canadian artists honoured at the Governor-General’s Awards, which are typically recognized as “lifetime achievement” awards, Kim Adams is an internationally recognized sculptor who has exhibited extensively throughout Canada, across North America and in Europe in both traditional gallery spaces and more public locations. He was also one of the artists included in 2012’s Oh, Canada exhibit at MASS MoCA.

Kim Adams "Autolamp - 2008" (Perforated ’85 Dodge Ram)

Kim Adams “Autolamp – 2008” (Perforated ’85 Dodge Ram)

As his page at representing gallery Diaz Contemporary notes, Adams’ “challenging aesthetic and sense of humor emerge throughout his diverse practice.” Adams, along with the seven other winning artists, will be honoured at the official awards ceremony on March 26 at Ottawa’s Rideau Hall. There will also be a group exhibit of the winners’ works from March 27 to July 6, 2014, at the National Gallery of Canada.

The Governor General’s Awards in Visual and Media Arts were created in 1999 by the Canada Council for the Arts and the Governor General of Canada. The awards celebrate Canada’s vibrant arts community and recognize remarkable careers in the visual and media arts. Nominations are taken each spring, and winners announced the following March.

Carol Wainio (photo: Martin Lipman)

Carol Wainio (photo: Martin Lipman)

And in the good-timing department, another of this year’s Governor-General’s Award winners is Ottawa-based painter and University of Ottawa visual arts professor Carol Wainio. Known for her large, layered acrylic canvases, Wainio just happens to be the next Visiting Artist for the Visual Arts department. You can hear her speak at 8pm on Wednesday, March 12, in room A162 of the Visual Arts building. It’s free and the general public is welcome.

Getting medieval

Milwright speaking to the media at 2012's Medieval Workshop

Milwright speaking to the media at 2012’s Medieval Workshop

It’s not a time machine per se, but it just might be the next best thing when it comes to art history. The 34th annual Canadian Conference of Medieval Art Historians runs March 7 and 8 right here at UVic, and features a fascinating lineup of speakers and presentations (a full list of which can be found below).

Amidst the faculty and graduate students coming in from universities across Canada, our own History in Art department is well-represented at the CCMAH, including presentations by Evanthia Baboula, Catherine Harding, Marcus Milwright, Erica Dodd and Lesley Jessop, as well as representatives from other UVic departments.

(Relevant sidenote: Marcus Milwright is also presenting a separate talk this week, titled “The Crafts of Damascus at the Dawn of the Modern Age.” Milwright will be looking at how the Syrian capital achieved fame since the medieval period as a centre of craft excellence, particularly in media such as inlaid metalwork, glazed ceramics, enameled glass and decorative woodwork. These crafts survived into the 19th century, but many were adversely affected by competition with industrially manufactured goods coming from the factories of Europe. Milwright uses evidence from an Arabic dictionary of Damascene crafts assembled between 1890 and 1908 to demonstrate the interdependent nature of the 400 crafts operating in and around the city. 7:30-9:30pm Thursday, March 6, in the University Centre Senate Chambers.)

Former UVic prof John Osborne

Former UVic prof John Osborne

Keynote speakers for the CCMAH include Joe Polzer, associate fellow with UVic’s Centre for Studies in Religion & Society, and Dr. John Osborne. Currently dean of Carleton University’s Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, as well as a professor of Art History, Osborne is particularly notable for his time as a professor of medieval art in our own History in Art department, as well as being the co-founder (alongside John Tucker) of UVic’s Medieval Studies program.

While there doesn’t seem to be an active link to any wesbite for the 2014 conference, click here to read more about past conferences. The Canadian Conference of Medieval Art Historians runs Friday, March 7, in UVic’s  Arbutus/Queenswood Room and Saturday, March 8 in room 103 of the Fine Arts building.

Here’s the complete list of speakers and their presentations:

FRIDAY, MARCH 7 – Arbutus/Queenswood Room

  • 9:30 Joe Polzer, Professor Emeritus, Calgary & Victoria: “Cimabue Reconsidered”
  • 10:00 Anne Napoli, Master’s student, University of Victoria: “How do you solve a problem like Maria? Examining polymateriality in the Madonna and Child Enthroned of Florence’s Santa Maria Maggiore.”
  • 10:30 Catherine Harding, University of Victoria: “Blood: The Relic of the Corporal at Orvieto Cathedral as Divine Witness”
  • 11:30 John Osborne, Carleton University: “The identification of the pope in the Santa Sabina narthex mural”
  • 12:00 Erica Cruikshank Dodd, University of Victoria: “A Silver Mythological Plate From Tarsos”
  • 2:00 Evanthia Baboula, University of Victoria: “Philagathos on the Cappella Palatina and the Mediterranean silk industry of the twelfth century”
  • 2:30 Munazzah Akhtar, doctoral candidate, University of Victoria: “Piety, Patronage and Politics: Samma Jams of Sindh and the Development of Makli Necropolis, 1380-1524”
  • 3:30 Marcus Milwright, University of Victoria: “Reading in the Round: The Evolution of Concentric Inscriptions in Early Islamic Architecture”
  • 4:00 Anthony Welch, University of Victoria: “A Tiger in Isfahan”
  • 4:30 Barry Magrill, UBC, Centre for Teaching Learning Technology: “MOOC’s Massive Open Online Courses”

SATURDAY, March 8 – Fine Arts building, room 103

  • 9:00  Malcolm Thurlby, York University: “Observations On Structure And Vault Design In Romanesque Italy”
  • 9:30 Caroline Novak, York University: “Gaping Maws: Orality and Oral-Figuration in English Romanesque Sculpture”
  • 10:00 Timothy Ashmore, Master’s student, York University: “Castle Hall of England”
  • 10:30 Valeriya Kotsyuba, York University: “Let me to the Marriage of Great Minds: An Examination of St Peter’s, Northampton”
  • 11:30 Richard A. Sundt, University of Oregon: “Oslo’s Stone Churches at Hovedöya and Gamlebyen and the Tradition of Double-Nave Planning in Scandinavia (11th-15th centuries)”
  • 12:00 Debora Alcide, York University: “Auxerre Cathedral: Innovation in Burgundy”
  • 2:00 C. Ruth Krindle, University of Manitoba: “The Theophilus Relief at Souillac:  The Second Foot of the Devil”
  • 2:30 Jim Bugslag, University of Manitoba: “The Trade Windows of Chartres Cathedral: Historiography and New Approaches”
  • 3:00 Lesley Jessop, University of Victoria: “Trade Images at the Cathedral of Notre-Dame in Paris”
  • 3:45 Jill Bain, University of the Fraser Valley: “Medieval Art and Modern Technology: Image-Enhancing Applications for the Study of Medieval Wall Painting”
  • 4:15 Helene Cazes, University of Victoria: “Tokens of friendship and symbols of erudition: the emblems of Amicitia in sixteenth century Alba Amicorum
  • 4:45 Michael F. Reed, University of Victoria: From Crown Colony to Confederation: Medievalism and Cultural Identity on Vancouver Island