Harald Krebs celebrates his silver anniversary at UVic

There is much to be lauded of long-time UVic faculty member Dr. Harald Krebs, professor and Head of Theory at the School of Music. While 2011 marked his 25th year at UVic, Krebs was also named a University of Victoria Distinguished Professor in 2010—the highest academic honour the university can bestow on a faculty member. “I am very grateful to the University for this award. It’s wonderful when your own university recognizes you for your research as well as your teaching,” says Krebs, who is using the award to fund research and conference travel, and to invite guest speakers and performers to the School of Music.

As the 11th recipient of the prestigious award, Krebs has been invited to give a public presentation for UVic’s Distinguished Professor Lecture Series. “I am happy to have the opportunity to give a talk on campus. It is a way of saying ‘thank you’ to the University,” says Krebs. The talk, intended for a broad audience, grows out of his recent research on how song composers manipulate the rhythm of poetry for expressive purposes.

“It was during this research that I became enthralled with Robert Schumann’s late songs, which are not sufficiently appreciated by scholars and performers. I look forward to acquainting the audience with this wonderful music, both by talking about and performing it,” says Krebs, who will be joined by his wife, soprano Sharon Krebs, for the performance portions of the presentation.

In addition to his work at UVic, in October 2011 Krebs became President of the Society for Music Theory, the primary scholarly society in the field.  Although the position is one of many demands, Krebs finds the work rewarding. “I’m enjoying it all very much—especially because I like and admire all the people with whom I am working,” expresses Krebs, who previously served on several committees of the Society, and as its vice president.

—Kristy Farkas

Harald Krebs’ lecture, Robert Redeemed: The Beauty of Schumann’s Late Songs, will be held on Tuesday, January 24 at 7:30 p.m. in the Phillip T. Young Recital Hall. Admission is free.